Cordoba, Argentina

More stories of more trips! Last weekend we went to Cordoba, Argentina. Cordoba is the second biggest city in Argentina and is in the middle of the country. The landscape just outside the city is actually very similar to that of the US Midwest (particularly Kansas).

Just outside of Cordoba Ciudad.

Just outside of Cordoba Ciudad.

My travel buddy and I explored the city a lot and went to a ton of museums while we were there. one of the most interesting museums was El Museo de la Memoria which commemorates the people, call Los Desaparecidos (the Disappeared), who were killed during the military dictatorship in the 70s and 80s.

Outside the museum, flyers of those who were kidnapped and presumably killed, but whose whereabouts and fates are still unknown.

Outside the museum, flyers of those who were kidnapped and presumably killed, but whose whereabouts and fates are still unknown.

I also really liked the Plazas in Cordoba. They are slightly bigger than the ones in Mendoza (which I also love), but they were also more artsy and less classic, which made them more interesting to talk about. For example this plaza had 200 giant rings in it. Each ring represented a year since Argentine independence and told a little bit of the history of the country from that year.

Very colorful and fun to play on.

Very colorful and fun to play on.

The main Plaza in Cordoba is called Plaza San Martin (what else would it be called, after all?) and the floor of the plaza was really cool. It was a reflection of the buildings right around it.

Reflection of a church on the floor of the plaza.

Reflection of a church on the floor of the plaza.

While exploring the city we also stumbled upon a huge slide that little kids were sliding down on pieces of cardboard. So we made like to locals and slid. It was super fun and would’ve never been allowed to happen in the US.

Down the slide!

Down the slide!

We also took a day trip to the small town of Alta Gracia. Alta Gracia in very small in comparison to both Cordoba and Mendoza and is known primarily as the childhood home of Che Guevara, who played a major role in the Cuban Revolution. His childhood home had been turned into a museum that was interesting. But better than the museum was the tranquility of this sweet little town!

A park in Alta Gracia

A park in Alta Gracia

Janelle and I both really enjoyed it because it was so cute, the air was fresh (not that it’s terrible in Mendoza, but it is still a city), there was tons of open space, and for the first time since I have been in Argentina we heard nothing but silence for a few minutes. No road noise, no people, nothing. It was a welcome break from the noise of the city.

Obligatory trip selfie!

Obligatory trip selfie!

I should also mention our hostel. While I have no pictures of it, it was amazing. The travelers we met there were super interesting and nice! One of them decided to cook an Asado (Argentine version of a Barbecue) for the entire hostel! The owner of the hostel was super nice, younger woman who took care of us very well! She always made sure to ask how we were doing, if we needed anything, how our day was. It was fantastic! If I go back to Cordoba, I would for sure go back to that hostel.

We did our 10 hour bus ride back to Mendoza overnight again, but I found this bus very uncomfortable, so I slept very little, and was so bus sick by the end of it that I didn’t go to our first class the next day. However because I couldn’t sleep I did manage to get this amazing picture just as the sun was rising, very early in the morning, somewhere in the Mendoza Province.

Beautiful country.

Beautiful country.

You have to look at the silver linings of things. Trust me it was more beautiful in person than this picture shows.

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